The Fetch Blog

The best events and reads for professionals

Interview: Kath Viner, Editor in Chief at Guardian Australia — July 19, 2013

Interview: Kath Viner, Editor in Chief at Guardian Australia

The Guardian logo

When I joined we were the seventh biggest newspaper in Britain; today we are the third biggest English language newspaper in the world.

It’s one of the  most renowned newspapers in the world with a loyal following and killer leadership in digital media. Now the publisher behind the recent Snowden-leaked NSA PRISM surveillance program, has launched the Guardian Australia. We got some questions in with Katharine Viner, the editor-in-chief, to see how the new local edition is going…

Congrats on the launch. How do you feel the reception’s gone so far?

We’re thrilled by all of it: the traffic, the way our readers are engaging with us, the sorts of stories we’ve managed to deliver, and the warmth with which Guardian Australia has been received.

What can we expect from The Guardian Australia in the coming months? Will we see a localised version of Soulmates for instance?

We’re looking at all sorts of things; for example, we’ve already launched the Guardian Masterclasses for Australia, which have proved very popular.

The Guardian has a strong reputation for data journalism – what other key elements position the masthead uniquely in the Australian media marketplace?

We are digital-only, which means we are able to exploit everything that digital has to offer and we are able to find, tell and spread stories in all sorts of new ways; and we’re truly global, with a network of correspondents around the world plus large teams in the US and UK. Also our ownership structure is unique: we are owned by a trust, with any profits going back into the journalism, which means that our journalists are free to say anything. We’re truly independent.

What’s the biggest change you’ve seen in media since joining The Guardian in 1997?

Clearly, the rise of digital; and it has been fantastic to be at the forefront of that with the Guardian. When I joined we were the seventh biggest newspaper in Britain; today we are the third biggest English language newspaper in the world.

Have you ever felt your gender has impacted on your ability to progress in journalism and your wider career?

Not yet. Probably because I’ve spent most of my career at the Guardian, where there are many women in senior roles.

You also wrote the award-winning play My Name Is Rachel Corrie – will we see any further theatre forays in the future? 

I love theatre but the day job is pretty hectic these days…

Why Sydney as your base?

It’s where most of our readers are, but we have a national focus and a particular interest in Melbourne.

How do you take time out to unwind?

I think I know the concept but I can’t quite remember what it means… Theoretically: swimming, walking and reading

Can The Fetch readers expect any Guardian Australia related events?

Hope so.

About our contributors // Kat Loughrey is the curator of The Fetch Melbourne and Kate Kendall is the founder and CEO of The Fetch.  

Interview: SF Local, Sandi MacPherson of Quibb — June 13, 2013

Interview: SF Local, Sandi MacPherson of Quibb

This week Eliza interviews the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Quibb.com, Sandi MacPherson. Follow Sandi on Twitter via @sandimac.

Sandi MacPherson
Sandi MacPherson

You are the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Quibb. What is it about your job that gets you out of bed and into the office every morning?

Sometimes when I tell people I’m working on a news product, they roll their eyes and say ‘…another one?’. That attitude is exactly what I think makes the job fun, interesting, and challenging. News is a busy space with no clear winner and it’s a huge market. It’s an established product category with a lot of room for innovating, and plenty of challenges to keep the work exciting.

Beyond that, it really is all about the people. I’ve spoken to so many Quibb members that have had really positive experiences (both online and offline) that wouldn’t have occurred without the product, and it’s amazing to be able to help those interactions occur and relationships develop. My experience with Quibb has also been a bit self-serving, in that I’ve built the perfect learning tool for myself. I’m new to the tech/startup world, and Quibb is a professional news product. This means that it allows me to easily find and read about exactly the topics, trends and news that I need everyday. The first thing I both need and want to check in the morning is Quibb, which is perfect!

Some would describe Quibb as a Reddit for professionals. Why do you think this kind of platform is so appealing? 

There’s so much content available to professionals (especially those of us that work in tech/startups) and it’s getting more and more difficult to find really great content. It’s even more difficult to have interesting discussions around that content with topic experts and professional peers. Through the simple idea of ‘share what you’re reading for work’, Quibb allows professionals to share all the great content they’re reading – and with a basic follower model, others can also get a feed packed full of great content, directly from people within their industry. The initial Quibb membership is focused on tech and startup professionals (i.e. designers, founders, VCs, developers), and will eventually allow professionals from any industry vertical to see what experts and thought leaders from their particular niche are reading and what they think about it.  The role of industry journals and trade publications hasn’t evolved at the same pace that social sharing has, and I think there’s a big opportunity to learn from sites and communities like Reddit, Tumblr, Hacker News, and others – but with a context that is 100% professional.

Do you think the popularity of news/content aggregation will continue to grow, and do you have any predictions for the future of the content sharing website?

There will always be a need for professional news. I believe that great content will win, irrespective of where it comes from.

Traditionally, news organizations have been about vertical integration of content, ads, and distribution. Now this ecosystem is becoming fragmented, where each of those 3 is its own ecosystem. Great content will increasingly find distribution because all of the aggregators and various curation products exist and are seeking that content out – they’re making it easier for people to find it

In the past, the editor-curated model was the most popular – someone within a news organization was responsible for determining (based on a variety of factors) which content to promote. Today, people are more enabled to seek out content that interests them. Running this experiment over the past few years, it turns out that sometimes this leads to more funny cat pictures and less serious journalism. The news market will grow and become more efficient over time. Similarly, I believe that we’ll create and people will find much richer and fragmented ways for both distributors and creators to monetize their audience via many different publishing platforms across many different monetization models.

All of this means that everything is becoming more complex… but that’s what an efficient marketplace looks like, that’s what progress in this space will look like.

You’ve been a leader in ensuring transparency between the Quibb and its users throughout the site’s development. What do you see as the benefits of transparency, and what advice would you give to young startups looking to be proactively transparent for their user base?

I’ve written lots of posts on Quibb – everything from why I’ve added new features, to explaining what I’m working on at the moment and why. Personally, I don’t really think of it as a novel approach, and don’t really understand why I wouldn’t act this way! Part of the reason why it makes sense specifically for Quibb (and potentially other products in this product category) is that the product itself is the members – it’s built on their connections, the content they share, the discussions they partake in. It would be silly for me to not initiate a relationship with the members. Also, I often say that I view all Quibb members as ‘mini-advisors’. My background isn’t related to tech or startups, while almost all Quibb members have expertise in an area that touches the product (e.g. interaction design, email deliverability, community management, etc.).

The fact that I’m so open is a way to initiate discussions with members whose opinions and thoughts I really value, and can learn a lot from as I try to make the product better.

You previously spent your career as a climate change and cleantech professional. What do you attribute as the cause for your move from the environmental sector to the startup world?

It’s complicated 🙂 I worked for Environment Canada (Canada’s federal environment department) directly out of school, followed by positions with a few smaller climate change non-profits. After realizing how hard it is to actually have an impact and create change through those types of organizations, I decided to go back to school and get my MBA, focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility. I was very disappointed when I realized that all of the things that I was learning about there wouldn’t be very impactful either. Since 1/2 an MBA is both useless and expensive, I decided to finish my 2nd year – but I shifted my classes to align with my personal Plan B, which had always been entrepreneurship, specifically something tech related. It’s then that I started going to some startup events in Toronto, and got a taste for all of the things I could potentially work on and create. I started by working on a professional volunteer matching product, but never made it very far. I realized pretty quickly that while the Toronto startup ecosystem is full of talented, super smart people – the quickest and easiest way to de-risk any idea or product that I would work on in the future would be to move to the valley. So I did.

Which Bay Area events or communities are you involved in?

Honestly, not very many. The community that has developed on Quibb has provided me with more connections with great tech and startup people than I could ever hope for! I’ve hosted a few Quibb member-only events too (one in Palo Alto, two in SF, and most recently one in NYC) which have gone over really well. I’m hoping to do more of these in the future, as I think that connecting with Quibb members that you meet online is really important, and helps to strengthen those relationships.

Blue Bottle or Philz?

New Orleans Iced Coffee from BB – straight black (…which I have to convince them to serve to me, most occasions).

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About our contributor // Eliza Dropkin is a lover of live music, good food, and beautiful places. Connect with her on Twitter via @elizadropkin.

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