The Fetch Blog

Curated reads and events for professionals

Top 20 places to find a remote job online — September 1, 2015

Top 20 places to find a remote job online

Remote work is no longer considered unusual, with millions of people across the world opting to work out of the office. In the United States alone, freelancers are said to make up 34% of the workforce — many of whom have chosen to work as entrepreneurs, consultants, and independent contractors. From freelancers to those in full-time remote roles, we are slowly breaking away from a traditional model to change the way we work.

Looking to ditch your commute or try something new? The following 20 sites and job boards cater to remote workers of almost every kind, with listings for creatives, professionals with technical talent, and everyone in between.

1. CloudPeeps
CloudPeeps is a quality-driven marketplace, community and platform that empowers freelancers and businesses to do their best work. Freelance ‘Peeps’ who are vetted and approved to access the platform so they can view opportunities that range from hourly compensation to fixed monthly pricing. Freelancers can also create a customize Storefront to sell their services and market themselves from. As CloudPeeps does the legwork of finding clients, processing payments, managing contracts, and account management – all a freelancer has to do is focus on creating great work.

2. We Work Remotely
Put together by the bright folks who founded 
37Signals and authored Remote, this job board is a valuable collection of various types of remote work. From programming to customer happiness, look here for some of the finest offerings from legitimate tech companies.

3. Working Nomads
Perhaps the easiest job ‘search’ of them all, this clever resource will deliver freelance opportunities that meet desired criteria directly to an inbox daily or weekly, depending on the specified preference and desired workload.

4. Remotive
A weekly newsletter of tips and opportunities for the global, remote professional. A great resource for freelancers, digital nomads and those just beginning a remote career path.

5. Remote OK
Embracing the future of work, Remote OK is an aggregator that shares the best contract, part-time, and full-time work from a multitude of job boards. Job hunters can access freshly pulled opportunities by visiting the site or signing up to receive email notifications.

6. Remote.co
Apple, IBM and American Express are just a few of the employers that use Remote.co to find talent. Sales professionals, consultants, and coders can all find work here, along with developers, analysts, and writers.

7. JobScribe
Focused on startups, JobScribe emails targeted work opportunities at a chosen frequency (daily, weekly, monthly). Most opportunities are for the technically trained, but marketing and design gigs sometimes make their way into the mix.

8. WFH.io
These job boards focus on the technology space and post new, remote roles often. Areas of interest range from customer service and design to quality assurance and development. Employers are listed in an alphabetical directory that currently spans an impressive 33 pages.

9. SkillBridge
Employers looking for the elite turn to SkillBridge, a marketplace that matches top-tier contract consultants to companies in need of specific, expert skill. Skillbridge is an ideal remote job search tool for those with advanced degrees from prominent universities or experience with well-known, innovative companies.

10. Fiverr
This fast-growing platform offers a huge variety of micro-jobs, allowing a remote worker to capitalize on an entire skill set. With prices starting at five dollars, it’s time to finally utilize all of those seemingly random talents, like photo editing, banner making, and ad design.

11. Upwork
Formerly known as oDesk, this platform prides itself on matching employers with freelancers who can work on jobs of any size, at any time, from anywhere. A breadth of categories showcases work opportunities for virtual assistants, writers, and consultants.

12. AngelList
AngelList is an outstanding resource for remote workers who want the startup life without the commute that so often comes with it. In addition to surfacing remote roles through a simple search (choose ‘job type’ and ‘remote OK’), the directory also offers helpful information about the company and compensation.

13. Remote Working
Mostly helpful for engineers and developers, Remote Working is a valuable resource for “people who don’t like to go to work.” Customer service, design, and operations roles are sometimes found in the mix.

14. The Muse
This valuable site not only features compelling content and helpful career reads – it’s also home to some of the best remote job opportunities, which often fly under the radar. Use search and filter to see ‘flexible/remote’ listings, each with a beautiful photo and information about the company and position.

15. Dribbble
Perhaps best known as a ‘show and tell for designers’ portfolio-style platform, Dribble has added immense value for community members by sharing design-specific job listings. To find them, hover over ‘jobs’ and choose the second option, ‘remote/anywhere’.

16. Freelancer.com
Millions of people use this site, which has been featured by TIME and The Wall Street Journal, to find their next project. Most impressive is the incredible range of categories, which employ freelancers who work on everything from robot design to logos.

17. FlexJobs
FlexJobs has developed a good reputation their screening process, which ensures that all job postings are legitimate. With a huge range of categories, there’s a multitude of part-time, full-time, and contract opportunities to check out and consider.

18. Scripted
Writers take note — Scripted is a trusted marketplace that provides clients with copywriting and editing services. A few samples and a writing test are required to join, and writers are granted the ability to view work opportunities after being formally admitted.

19. Stack Overflow
This well-known site is dedicated to providing top technical talent with the best out-of-office opportunities. Want to work as a remote developer? Don’t miss the 2,000+ listings showcased here.

20. Power to Fly
Serving up remote work opportunities for women who live anywhere, Power to Fly counts vetted professionals in more than 4,000 global cities. Clients have included Skillcrush and Hearst, among others.

Know of another great resource for finding remote work? Leave us a note in the comments!

About our writer // Krista Gray is the director of community operations at The Fetch. She loves travel, words, photos and making people smile. Follow her on Twitter, @thekristagray.

Top 10 writers festivals around the globe — February 23, 2014

Top 10 writers festivals around the globe

type

What makes a great writer’s festival?

Regardless of size, location or theme, a great writer’s festival provokes discussion and debate, encourages creativity and reflection, and showcases inspiring writers and thinkers. It celebrates its local literary culture while also facilitating discussions of global importance. And most importantly, it’s fun. Here are a few of the world’s best to add to your bucket list.

1) Jaipur Literary Festival (India)

The air I breathe is filled with words – Mahasweta Devi 

The Greatest Literary Show on Earth – or so its organizers call it. And when you’re sitting in a huge tent surrounded by a very vocal audience of Indians and travellers from all around the world, it’s hard to deny that the Jaipur Literary Festival is one of the most vibrant. Founded by charismatic British author Will Dalrymple, this festival blends music and fun alongside thought-provoking and lively debate.

January each year – http://jaipurliteraturefestival.org

2) Digital Writers’ Festival (everywhere) 

Are we live? –  Sam Twyford-Moore

Aimed at connecting emerging writers around the world to talk about their writing lives, the Digital Writers’ Festival is an innovative online event that takes place in real time via Twitter and Google Hangouts. The extensive program overcomes time zone challenges to present international discussions that are experimental, challenging and informative.

February each year – http://digitalwritersfestival.com

3) The Bookworm International Literary Festival, Beijing (China) 

I’m told that laughter is the highest wisdom of the human race.  – Li Er

At once cosy and a bit chaotic, Beijing’s Bookworm bookstore hosts several exciting weeks of bilingual literary events and fascinating discussions about the Asia region. The lantern-lit on-site café is a great place to order a cup of tea (or wine) and strike up a conversation with ex-pats and Chinese students alike.

March each year – http://bookwormfestival.com

4) PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature (USA) 

The creative act requires not only freedom but also this assumption of freedom. –  Salman Rushdie

Aligned with PEN, a social justice organisation giving voice to writers around the world who have been silenced, this impressively diverse festival is one of the most important on the global literary calendar. Each year World Voices features an impressive selection of challenging and thought-provoking events across New York City to inspire discussion, reflection and debate.

April to May each year – http://worldvoices.pen.org

5) Etonnant Voyageurs, St Malo (France) 

And this brings us back to literature’s ability to relate the world. – Michele le Bris  

Etonnant Voyageurs (‘Amazing Travellers’) has taken the idea of a festival of travel writing and stretched it to become an exploration of world literature in French. Set in a historic city on the beautiful Brittany coast, the festival of mostly-free events attracts a lively international roster and throws down some challenging sessions. It also offers exhibitions of French graphic novels, a film festival, and a huge book market. Allez!

February or March each year – http://www.etonnants-voyageurs.com

melb-writersMelbourne Writers Festival

6 ) International  Literary Festival  of  Paraty (FLIP), Brazil 

Fiction transforms memory and imagination into language – Milton Hatoum

Throughout its five-day duration FLIP holds, amazingly, over 200 events, including debates, shows, exhibitions, workshops, film screenings and school presentations. The main events are presented in unique round-table style, making it an engaging experience for writers and the audience alike. The enthusiasm of Paraty’s residents adds to the good vibes surrounding this unique festival.

July to August each year – http://www.flip.org.br

7) Edinburgh International Book Festival (Scotland) 

Thank you for your excellent questions. – JK Rowling

It’s hard to go past the oldest and largest literary festival in the world. Year after year, the Edinburgh International Book Festival attracts the biggest names in writing for serious literary discussions. The Festival takes place in an elegant tent city in Charlotte Square Gardens and its on-site bookstore is astounding, with separate shops for grown-ups and children.

(And a bonus festival tip: be sure to pop into the Book Fringe at Word Power bookstore, part of the Edinburgh Fringe, bringing writers and activists together for lively readings and discussions.)

August each year – https://www.edbookfest.co.uk

8) Book Passage Travel Writers & Photographers Conference, San Francisco (USA)   

Here’s how I lost my voice and found my vision – Don George 

Part-conference, part festival, this four-day intensive is the destination for aspiring travel writers. Chaired by legendary travel writer Don George, the weekend features talks, workshops and industry networking events. It’s an illuminating and informative weekend but most of all, as you would expect from a killer lineup of travel writers, a conference filled with good parties and remarkable stories from the road.

August each year – http://www.bookpassage.com/travel-writers-photographers-conference

9) Ubud Writers and Readers Festival (Indonesia)

Books opened the world to me. –  Ahmad Fuadi

Sunny days, balmy nights, open-air venues and lush tropical views make Ubud Writers & Readers Festival in Bali one of the world’s most appealing literary destinations. Long-table lunches and sundowner cocktail events make this festival highly sociable, and if the fun gets too much there are plenty of places to escape for a quiet swim, relaxing pedicure or a spot of peaceful yoga.

October each year – http://www.ubudwritersfestival.com

And of course…

10) Melbourne Writers Festival (Australia)! 

Meaning lies in the magic of the coincidence that you should come across work at just the right time. – Tavi Gevinson

I’m proud to be a part of a writer’s festival that holds its own alongside the world’s biggest, best and brightest literary events. Melbourne Writers Festival is the literary festive season to Melbourne’s busy annual calendar of writing events. Whether you like your writer’s festivals to be intensely thought-provoking or wildly fun – or perhaps a both at the same time – we have you covered.

August each year – http://www.mwf.com.au

Subscribe to The Fetch in your city for reminders about the festivals and other related events throughout the year.

About our contributor // Lisa Dempster is the Director of the Melbourne Writers Festival. She travels widely in search of literary and other adventures. Follow her on Twitter via @lisadempster.

Image credit: Melbourne Writers Festival and sloeginfizz.

The Fetch seeks contributing writers — October 27, 2013

The Fetch seeks contributing writers

typewriter

We’re massive lovers of content at The Fetch – be it creating, curating, consuming or sharing – and now we’re looking for external contributing writers.

We’re seeking a handful of contributors at the local level to produce interesting and relevant posts across the US, Europe and Asia Pacific (Australia/NZ). This is a cool opportunity for freelance writers and professional content creators to become our ongoing go-to contributor in a region. And yes, writers rejoice – these are paid contributor spots. 🙂

You’ll be recognised on The Fetch as the local contributing writer and your work will be read by a ever-growing community of professionals. Pieces will be published with a byline and any links you desire.

Writers should be:

  • Currently working as an independent writer, editor or content producer
  • Able to contribute at least two long-form (~800-word-plus posts) essay-style pieces and one short-form (curated lists or multimedia-driven) posts per month
  • Dependable, consistent and turn around copy on time
  • Completely across trends in digital, creative, startups, marketing, web/mobile, city happenings, career hacking, productivity, work-life happiness, urban geekiness and so forth in their region
  • Not too into themselves and a lover of high accuracy – this isn’t the place for loosely-researched opinion pieces
  • Fun, intelligent and insightful – we like to educate and entertain
  • Set-up to take payment from a US Inc. (payment will range from $50 to $150 per post depending on length and time)

Please email the following through to kate@thefetch.com:

  • Your website, Twitter, LinkedIn and portfolio
  • Links to examples of your three best published articles
  • Three example headlines of stories you would submit
  • Thee examples of brands, startups or individuals doing great things in your area
  • Your location and what regional contributor spot you’d like (this needs to be within our current city regions viewable at thefetch.com)
  • Why you want to be a contributing writer at The Fetch

We look forward to reviewing them there! We’ll do our best to respond to all applications and appreciate your time. 🙂


Image credit: Marie Campbell

Interview: SF Local, Drew Hoolhorst — May 26, 2013

Interview: SF Local, Drew Hoolhorst

This week Eliza interviews freelance copywriter and regular Bold Italic contributor, Drew Hoolhorst. Follow Drew on Twitter via @drewber and on his blog, Rocket Shoes

Drew Hoolhorst
Drew Hoolhorst

You, Drew Hoolhorst, are a master storyteller. Who do you consider your earliest influences, and how has your storytelling evolved over the years?

Thank you, interview question, that’s incredibly kind of you. Ready for the hokey answer? My grandfather was the best storyteller I’ve ever met in my lifetime. Since I was a tiny babe, he would tell me the most grandiose Big Fish-esque lies you’ve ever heard and I just couldn’t get enough. There was sort of something great about it…his “art” of lying, really. I know that sounds horrible, but I loved how he could lie to me and tell these tales of absolute grandeur and even when I knew they were lies or at least stretches of truths, I just loved hearing them. The man just knew how to make you feel like you were the only person he was talking to, or had EVER spoken to, and that’s an art.

I’ve always tried to mimic that in any form of writing or storytelling: say things that readers and listeners feel like are just for them. In the best writing, that’s there, really. You are speaking to a million people, but if it were just one you’d tell it just as personally.

Some would say you are well known for your contributions to The Bold Italic. How would you breakdown your creative writing process?

It’s simple: come up with a great idea when you’re talking to people you care about. Laugh with them about it because you all agree that this is something you all feel and could talk about for hours. Every time: that’s where you start. The best stuff comes from conversations with people you care about, because when you’re just shooting the sh*t, that’s when you say the random Seinfeld-esque stuff that really sticks in your head… everyone’s head. After that?

Get a deadline, wait until the last minute, panic and then write. Don’t ever write ahead of time. You’ll write a huge piece of shit. Panic, man. It brings out some wonderful stuff, in my opinion.

Having worked as a freelance copywriter for SF advertising agency EVB, how do you gauge what style of writing will be the best suited for a particular audience?

In all honesty, you just listen to the client and then (in my case, because I’m small fry) you don’t wait to hear what your CD’s have to say to you, you listen to what they say to the other important people in the room that are just like them. Basically: what bosses say to bosses? Write for that audience. Because that’s when everyone’s really being completely honest, and that’s when people say the off the cuff stuff that tells you exactly what we all think we should be writing or concepting to.

As a freelancer what is your best self-motivation tactic, and what advice would you give to professionals considering freelance work?

Freelancing has been a funny thing. In the beginning, it’s like sex: you have no idea what you’re doing and you just lie incessantly to get everyone thinking you’ve been doing this for ages. I try to always remember that beginning part because after each job, you’ve sponged up a little more knowledge from some really amazing creative people and you’re that much better than you were when you walked in their door. Basically, every time I can’t self motivate, I remember that I used to have no idea what I was doing, and if it’s this much fun now, how much fun will it be if I keep my ass in gear? You can always get better, and I try to just remember that.

If you’re considering freelancing, just remember that it’s like getting a new job all the time, always. It’s hard, but it’s also incredibly fun to get a new uniform every month or so.

481082_10151422651353914_2137386649_n

You worked as a social media strategist for the creative agency Mekanism back in 2006. What has surprised you about the evolution of social media, and do you have any predictions about how it will change in the future?

What’s surprised me is how far it’s come since then. I mean, I remember explaining to senior creatives how “the youtubes and the tweeters” worked back in the day and how strangely slow they were to grasp it and/or take it seriously, and it’s just really funny how now all of them add you on a social network every other day like a parent trying to add their daugther on Facebook (I say in jest, my bosses at the time were incredible people.) I think things like Vine have jumped the shark a bit, where it’s really awesome but…I don’t know, do we really have to have THAT short of an attention span? I like what companies like Medium are doing in trying to Goldilocks the blog/twitter conundrum a bit, and I think service apps are only going to get more amazing. Not a bold prediction, I know, but I think people are going to back off of the hyper short attention span stuff and focus more on making a service that’s “food delivery for blank” for every last thing on the planet.

You have a self-proclaimed ‘black belt in feelings’. What exactly do you mean by that?

It means I was raised by a single mother and have an extensive shoe collection and am happy to talk about feelings until both of our ears hurt. (I’ve just always been the sensitive guy my whole life, guess it just sort of stuck.)

734465_10151472812793914_863280084_n

What are your favorite events and communities in SF?

I love Noise Pop and Outside Lands to an almost unhealthy degree, and I’m so happy that OSL is finally getting to the level of Lollapalooza and what not. We deserved to have something like that here in SF. We’re a bunch of “neener neener” artisanal fans, it’s only right we get to see bands that no one’s ever heard of yet.

About our contributor // Eliza Dropkin is a lover of live music, good food, and beautiful places. Connect with her on Twitter via @elizadropkin.

%d bloggers like this: