The Fetch Blog

Curated reads and events for professionals

Curator Year in Review 2012: Chloe in London — November 30, 2012

Curator Year in Review 2012: Chloe in London

As the end of 2012 approaches, we thought it’d be nice to have an update from our beloved city curators. To kick us off, Chloe Nicholls in London, aka @ThatGirl_Chloe, highlights some of her most appreciated events, spaces and top moments of 2012.

Chloe presenting for Techfluff.tv at The Lovie Awards

Best event for meeting people? 

Any of the events organised by @3Beards i.e. SiliconDrinkabout, Digital SizzleDon’t Pitch Me Bro – these guys have really revived the tech and startup scene in London.

Best event for content shared and learnings? 

General Assembly London for key learnings and workshops, and some favourite  conferences and events include Social Media WeekInternet Week EuropeleWeb LondonReMixMind the Product and Wired 2012

Personal event stye preference? 

Although I attend many conferences and big events every year, I prefer smaller panels and workshops, with a great MC who can ask direct questions – not only to the panel but to the audience too and get a debate going. I find that it’s the people in the audience who sometimes have the most interesting answers/points of view rather than the speakers or panel.

Favourite source of local community news? 

Twitter and Facebook is where I find out all my industry goss!

Favourite coworking space? 

For the creatives The Hospital Club and for the techies Google Campus and Central Working (great coworking spaces and cafe even if it’s sometimes bursting at the seams).

Favourite cafe with wifi? 

The Breakfast Club! (Good place for breakfast, lunch or both; brunch – plus they have great wifi access). 

What’s been a personal highlight and not so high moment of the year? 

Heading to SXSW with my team from Newspepper and low light, bit of an obvious one, but the summer rain before the London 2012 Olympics – it was endless rain for about one month.

What have you enjoyed about being involved with The Fetch in 2012?

The Fetch has been a great way to tap into London’s tech, business and creative communities and keep up-to-date on going on for professionals. By curating the newsletter, I get to discover new  events and share them with the rest of the community. I’ve definitely met some interesting characters along the way!

What are you looking forward to in 2013? 

I can’t wait to start hosting The Fetch Conversations – which are thought-leader dinners for The Fetch community plus continue to work with our brilliant Community Ambassadors and build the community for a wider audience. 

Event Review: Programming for Non-Programmers at GA — September 14, 2012

Event Review: Programming for Non-Programmers at GA

When: Saturday 1 September 2012
Where: General Assembly, 
9 Back Hill, 
4th Floor, London EC1R 5EN

Amanda Foley, London Community Ambassador, recently attended ‘Programming for Non-Programmers’, an intensive day-long workshop at General Assembly London, designed to teach you the basics in web development.

The course was a full-day intensive workshop at GA London led by Devin Hunt, YC 2007 alum and founder of Lyst, and was assisted by Rik Lomas. It was designed to give total beginners a crash-course in web development basics, including HTML, CSS and javascript.

Long before class was due to begin, the room was completely filled with eager mac-wielding students keen to learn and get their hands dirty with a bit of code. The crowd had varying levels of experience, from complete and total newbies, to folks who had a bit more experience, like myself, who just wanted to brush up on their skills.

We were warned that it was going to be seriously jam-packed day of information, so if you’re a total web development newbie, I’d recommend a full night of sleep and a strong coffee before you attend this course. Staying up late unpacking boxes is definitely not recommended. You may or may not nod off halfway through*.

You may think that six hours isn’t enough time to teach a complete newbie how to code a website, but you’d be wrong. Lucky for us, Canadian-born Devin can teach as fast as he talks, and after a mere six hours, we walked away having coded an entirely functional “business card” site. Courtney Boyd Myers, GA London’s Director of Audience Development took part in the day-long workshop as well, and even uploaded her website to dropbox to share.

Personally, I learnt a few amazing new tips and techniques to help my basic coding skills, which is invaluable for my career. It made me hungry to learn much more…and I’m already browsing the GA course lineup for more advanced courses!

If you’re interested in learning the basics in development yourself, they’re hosting another ‘Programming for Non-Programmers‘ in October. If you’re hungry to dive even deeper into learning front-end code, they’ve got an 8 week intensive crash-course on front-end development which looks seriously awesome and should turn into anyone into a front-end wizard in no time.

And lastly, you’re interested in any of their other courses, do check out the full GA London course lineup as listed in The Fetch each fortnight. They’ve got more design, development, social media, business and UX courses than you can shake a stick at!

*I may or may not have stayed up until 3am moving house the night before. Oopsie!

Event Review: How to Land a Job at a Startup — August 5, 2012

Event Review: How to Land a Job at a Startup

This event review of “How to land a job at a startup” is brought to you by Solange Francois, from our Fetch Community Ambassador Team in Sydney.

On Thursday, 26th July I attended General Assembly’s ‘How to Land a Job at a Startup’. It was an hour of ideas led by Riley Batchelor, who has been involved with startups for many years before deciding to use his skills and contacts for educating and mentoring.

What types of startup jobs are out there?

The majority of tech startup roles are, unsurprisingly, developer roles, but there are also requirements for sales, business development, marketing, commercial management, operations, admin and more.

What are the benefits of working at a startup?

Startups don’t operate like large, established companies. Startups generally offer flexibility in attire and work hours and autonomy that comes from a smaller, flatter management structure. Startups often work in co-working spaces so staff interact with a wide range of enthusiastic, ambitious entrepreneurs.

How can I make it happen?

  • Get your story straight – work out what you want to do and focus on a core skill
  • Make connections rather than rely on job boards – network and ask for introductions
  • Demonstrate your passion – know the company and become familiar with the product and space
  • Differentiate yourself – stand out, be creative and get noticed
  • Know your place – envision the role you’d play in the business and deliver that value before being asked
  • At interviews, share fresh ideas and demo your work
  • Consider up-skilling in areas you’re not familiar with so you’re able to offer a broader skill set
  • Investigate various sources, for example, connections, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook pages, The Fetch, Silicon Beach Australia board

The opportunities for people driven to become involved in this space continue to grow, but it’s not a conventional recruitment path so it’s up to the individual to take the lead, up-skill and get connected.

About our Ambassador // This article was contributed by Community Ambassador Solange Francois. She is a marketer and lover of travel with a passion for psychology and lifelong learning. You can connect with Solange through her blog or on Twitter @solangefrancois

Never stop learning! A London guide to short courses and workshops — July 13, 2012

Never stop learning! A London guide to short courses and workshops

You may have left school and formal education years ago, but this week London curator, Chloe Nicholls, has put together a list of places that regularly hold short courses, adult training and workshops to ensure you never stop learning. She’s also listed some popular online education and learning websites, so you can learn new skills and, who knows, perhaps you may even become a teacher yourself one day?

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General Assembly London

Recently launched in London last month, General Assembly is a global network of campuses for individuals seeking opportunity and education in technology, business, and design. You can learn anything from Management Reporting for Entrepreneurs, to Mobile Marketing and Front-End Web Development.

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The School of Life

The School of Life is a cultural enterprise offering intelligent instruction on how to lead a fulfilled life. They offer classes, workshops and books on topics such as how to find a job you love, a mindfullness one-day workshop and an overnight talk with a Magnum photographer, Martin Parr.

Decoded.co 

Got an awesome startup idea but don’t know how to code? Then join one of the tailored classes at Decoded, which is offers a one day workshop teaching anyone to code.  Code from scratch a multi-platform app in HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, the languages behind all modern web apps and sites.

Ideas Store

Ideas Store may look just like a library but it’s more than just books! With several locations based around East London, Ideas Store offers free courses, business help and learning opportunities.

InnerSpace

InnerSpace is a meditation and personal development centre based in Covent Garden. As Ferris Buller once said, ‘life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.’ Head to InnerSpace and take in some relaxation. Join one of their meditation courses, or even explore some of their talks such as S.T.O.P. the Stress and Anxiety & Fear.

If that wasn’t enough for you, there are also some great sites revolutionising online education and creating a community of students and teachers who are eager to learn new skills and be inspired by new ideas! Check out Chloe’s recommendations below:

Skillshare – Learn anything from anyone, anywhere.

Udemy – Amazing Instructors. Teaching the World.

Khanacademy – Trying to make a world-class education available to anyone, anywhere.

Gidsy – A place where anyone can explore, organize and book unique things to do.

Any we have missed? Tell us in the comments below!

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