The Fetch Blog

Curated reads and events for professionals

Going global: 10 places to find a startup job online — October 5, 2015

Going global: 10 places to find a startup job online

Have you wondered what it’s like to be a part of a small, early stage team? Do you work in the corporate world and find yourself craving a change? Do you love to work on interesting problems, and race to solve them before anyone else can? The booming global startup scene has exploded with opportunity for skilled workers everywhere.

We’ve already shared 20 sites for finding global, remote work and covered the best 15 places to find a startup job in London, so we thought it was time to put together a similarly styled list of resources for finding a startup job online. Good luck with your search!

1. Hired
Hired was built as a unique, two-sided marketplace designed to flip today’s recruiting model on its head — making the process less painful for everyone involved. The platform works by accepting highly qualified applicants and serving them up to companies (Eventbrite, Stripe) who can compete to make the individual an offer. Originally geared toward developers, Hired has expanded and now works with professionals across disciplines. Hired is also available to global workers who are searching for a startup job in the United States.

2. Angellist
Having grown tremendously in the last several years, Angellist is a powerful resource when searching for startup jobs around the world. Get a detailed look at each company with information about the objective, team, open roles and compensation. Completing a profile will allow companies to contact you first, giving you the ability to follow-up if there’s mutual interest.

3. The Muse
Not only a great career resource, The Muse also offers beautifully-designed job boards with many startup opportunities. Though The Muse counts open roles in more than 25 cities in North America, posted positions are US-based only.

4. Join-Startups
This smart site is helpful for job seekers in many major metros, including San Francisco, New York City, Paris, Stockholm, Tokyo, and Berlin. A simple search makes it easy to find available roles by location, many of which are pulled from Indeed.com (saving you from searching two separate sites). Join-Startups also sends a weekly email to those who subscribe and share specifics about their search.

5. Y Combinator Jobs
The Bay Area’s well-known accelerator posts startup jobs on the
Y Combinator website, with listings for startups funded through the program. Join a growing company like BitCoin, Instacart, LeTote, or ZeroCater, among other impressive options. Y Combinator also lists open roles on TripleByte.

6. Dreamers // Doers Gigs
Female-focused (and members only) Dreamers // Doers serves up actionable information, presents networking opportunities, and has a Facebook group completely dedicated to jobs and gigs. The community counts bright founders, savvy entrepreneurs and leading executives among those seeking and sharing open roles.

7. Linkedin
Startups have fully embraced Linkedin, with recruiters using it to find top-notch candidates. Standout with a high-quality, professional photo and an updated profile tailored to a startup job search. To unlock the full power of the professional platform, consider upgrading your account to take advantage of search and communication tools.

8. Venture Loop
With more than 41,000 listed startup jobs, Venture Loop is definitely a site worth surfing. A straightforward search page makes it easy to find jobs by category, location, or distance. Use keywords to find specific employers.

9. Switch
The ‘swipe right’ trend introduced by Tinder has become useful for much more than finding a mate! Switch uses the brilliantly simple functionality to match potential employees and employers in a fun, mobile format — which makes it easy to look for jobs while waiting in line or commuting by bus or train. The Switch app, available on iOS only, is fully functional in multiple countries. 

10. Vettery
This marketplace (currently serving New York City) takes a thoughtful approach to job placement by taking the time to get to know each candidate before matching them with an opportunity. Listed employers include Blue Apron, Hinge, and Uber. New Yorkers take note: Vettery is currently offering a $2,000 bonus to job seekers who are successfully matched!

Bonus: startup research


Now that you’ve kicked off your search, these sites will help you understand which startups are doing well, who’s on the team, and anything else you should know before applying or continuing a conversation:

CrunchBase
The go-to source for all things startups, CrunchBase compiles and lists information about funding rounds, team members, and company insights.

Breakoutlist.com
Like CrunchBase, The Breakout List is a great place to get a list of fast-growing startups, helping you to identify those that are worth joining. The Breakout List is updated four times a year, ensuring that information is consistently current.

Have you successfully transitioned from a corporation to a startup? Know of another site or app for startup job seekers that we should share? Drop us a note in the comments!

Featured job: Content optimisation specialist, Sportsbet, Australia — July 28, 2015

Featured job: Content optimisation specialist, Sportsbet, Australia

Featured job: Sports Bet

Sportsbet makes sport betting a fun and entertaining experience, offering  tools that help people assess their gambling habits, manage their betting activity, and provide access to problem gambling help services.

One of the best things about working at Sportsbet is the chance to truly grow a career. The company has just promoted the former Content Optimisation Specialist, which has created an opportunity for a content-loving sports enthusiast to jump into the open position.

This role sits within the Digital Operations teams at Sportsbet and forms part of the wider marketing team, which loves pushing boundaries. With a strong focus on innovation, the team is constantly searching for extraordinary new ways to attract attention. Sportsbet marketers use traditional and digital media to attract punters to the brand. Additionally, they’re dead keen on bringing the Sportsbet personality to life by thinking outside the box to invent brilliant campaigns.

About you

Sportsbet is looking for someone who lives and breathes digital platforms, understands what drives consumers to transact online, and who has a passion for sports. The team has promoted one superstar and is looking for the next. Do you have what it takes to fill these shoes?

Responsibilities

  • Ensure the Sportsbet.com.au digital properties display the best and most relevant content, in all places, at all times
  • Optimise the display of betting markets and promotional content to match the sporting calendar.
  • Manage and display complimentary content and respond to real-time opportunities during live sporting events.
  • Enhance the customer experience when interacting with digital properties by making measurable improvements to Sportsbet’s digital platforms.
  • Manage marketing-focused product development projects & pipeline, and contribute to digital solution development in cross functional teams.
  • Improve our owned digital platforms by developing insights and identifying opportunities for enhancement, and coordinating innovation initiatives from the marketing team.

Requirements

  • Excellent communication skills & ability to build and maintain strong internal relationships
  • Advanced numeracy and analytical skills with the ability to tell the story not just read the numbers.
  • Advanced understanding of consumer behaviour
  • Understanding of key events on sporting/racing calendar
  • Ability to work under pressure and on own initiative
  • Bachelors’ degree in marketing, business or commerce discipline
  • Experience in a digital marketing role within an e-commerce business
  • Experience using HTML and WordPress preferred

If you’re a solutions-focused self-starter who loves a bit of fun, likes to watch sports, and is committed to real time online content and product improvements then Sportsbet wants to hear from you. Sportsbet offers 5 weeks’ annual leave, great benefits and an awesome work culture. You’re at odds on for a rewarding career!

Sound like a fit? Apply here.

When it’s time to stay or when it’s time to go: how to know when it’s the right time to move on from your job — July 20, 2015

When it’s time to stay or when it’s time to go: how to know when it’s the right time to move on from your job

A job is a huge part of your identity and security, along with where you spend most of your waking time. For passionate employees, it can also serve as a foundation for future hopes and dreams. With such focus on work, it’s no wonder that finding the right company and role or considering leaving a current one is a major life decision.

Are you stuck in a professional limbo like this right now? If so, you might be losing sleep or feeling as if the weight of the world is on your shoulders. Hopefully, these considerations can help you make the best decision as to what to do moving forward:

You feel stressed out

According to the American Institute of Stress, 76% of people surveyed say that work and money are a leading causes of stress, listing job pressure as the number one reason they feel stressed out. 48% of respondents went on to share that stress has a negative impact on their personal and professional life, with 30% claiming that they’re “always” or “often” under stress at work.

Stress is a very real and present force in the workplace, causing a multitude of employees to suffer daily. In fact, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that stress costs $26 billion in medical and disability payments in addition to $95 billion in lost productivity per year. If you’re in a stressful situation (either mentally or physically) that negatively affects your quality of life, you have sound reason to consider searching for a different company or job.

You’ve lost your passion

“Find joy in everything you choose to do. Every job, relationship, home…it’s your responsibility to love it, or change it,” wisely said writer Chuck Palahniuk. A loss of passion related to personal growth and shifting interests can happen, particularly after spending a long period of time in a specific role or industry.

Do you dread going to work every morning? Are you bored out of your mind when you think about your to-do list? Are you disappointed that your talents aren’t being tapped? If any of these ring true, make it a point to speak with your manager first. In this case, your boss may be able to reassign you to a different project or position that’s better suited for your skill set and passions. No luck after catching up? You may want to consider alternative work options.

Things have changed with the company

Change at work is inevitable, but it can be a very real reason for feelings of discontent. Adjustments could include a boss you don’t jive with, out of scope work or a change in direction, lackluster projects, or new duties that deserve (and don’t receive) higher compensation. Feeling unheard or undervalued can increase feelings of bitterness, and the best thing to do in any of these instances is to directly discuss your feelings with a manager. If improvements aren’t made following a conversation, be honest with yourself and move on.

The office is a toxic environment

Do colleagues make sexist comments? Are teammates bullied or ridiculed? Do you feel as if you’re discriminated against for any reason? If so, be sure to create a strong paper trail. To do so properly, file a company complaint with a direct supervisor or the human resources department. Next, file a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) within 180 days of the incident. For further legal advice, contact a lawyer to guide you through necessary actions. While it’s understandable to want to move on as quickly and quietly as possible, protecting your rights and those of teammates who may have also been violated should always be carefully considered.

You’ve reached an ethical crossroads

Joining a new company is great, but sometimes the inner workings and true nature aren’t revealed until you’ve been at it for a while. Do you find that the mission, culture or values at your workplace make you cringe? Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and author, suggests that you should consider jumping ship if, “you feel that there are ethical or moral differences in how the company and you believe the firm should operate; cultural differences; work ethic clashes, and so on.”

You’re being transitioned out

Much like in a romantic relationship, there are often evident signs that hint the end could be near. Staff management expert Alison Green warns that, “If your boss used to give you feedback in person and now she’s putting criticism in emails, she may be creating a paper trail to build a case for firing you. Many companies require written documentation of problems and warnings before an employee is let go.”

Other signs of an impending transition may be a slower flow of projects or a lack of thoughtful feedback when you share concerns.

While deciding to leave a job is never easy, taking thoughtful steps can ease your stress and ensure that you’re making the best choice possible. Be sure to research all of your options before throwing in the towel, and remember that every job has benefits and setbacks. Should you decide to make a leap and try something new, asking trusted friends for opinions, saving a portion of your income, and keeping your resume/portfolio updated for a job hunt will all help make the transition process easier.

About our writer // Christina Morales is a freelance writer specializing in creating online marketing content. Her dream is to one day rule the world with just an iPad, a case of Cherry Coke, Twizzlers, and a glue gun.

10 Interview Etiquette Tips from The Hiring Line — June 30, 2013

10 Interview Etiquette Tips from The Hiring Line

This week, our new anonymous contributor brings you 10 things of what not to do in your next interview. After spending many years on the other side of the table, outside of the fancy tech and creative industries, they’ve seen it all. 

1. Do not arrive too early, it’s annoying and can show desperation.

2. Do not arrive late, it’s an automatic fail.

3. Shake hands with a firm grip – and clean finger nails.

4. Do not sit in the interviewer’s chair by accident.

5. Do not turn up smelling of alcohol, weed or strong body odour.

6. Dress appropriately – this doesn’t include underwear on show, dirty shoes or leopard print.

7.  Do not lie, be boring or mumble.

8. Do not chew gum, whistle or bite your nails (and then flick them on the floor).

9. Do not text, wear earphones, or let your phone ring during the interview.

10. If you get the job say thank you!

Quit watching and start doing: Sport Business in London — July 28, 2012

Quit watching and start doing: Sport Business in London

Pic by @Olympics on IG

Despite hosting the biggest sporting event of the year, Londoners seem to be divided in their opinion about the Olympic Games. On one hand, you have the supporters who are proud that their city is featuring on the biggest stage of all. On the other, you have the sceptics who bemoan the inconvenience and alleged waste of money.

As residents of the host city, we have been exposed to aspects of the games that the rest of the world won’t be aware of. One of these, commercial rights, has at times been a controversial topic as the London Organising Committee (LOCOG) has clamped down hard on any company that they deem to be infringing the rights of their major sponsors.

No doubt this will have piqued the interest of many marketing professionals who may be coming across the business side of the sports industry for the first time. They might well be seduced by it and who could blame them? It’s a glamorous mix of high profile stars and huge amounts of money.

The same may well apply to various other professionals too, such as events or media. But how do you go about getting a job in sports?

First and foremost, you need to be able to prove that you have transferable skills. In that respect, it’s no different from moving between any other industries. But this shouldn’t prove to be a much of a barrier for professionals from the industries mentioned earlier.

What’s equally important is networking. As the old cliché goes, it’s not just what you know but who you know.

The good news is that the sports industry is relatively small and there are several dedicated networking events throughout the year.

The Sport Business Group, organise many of the most high profile conferences throughout the year, such as sports Marketing 360 which takes place on 27 September. While the line-up for this year’s conference hasn’t been announced yet, previous speakers have included representatives from many of the UK’s top sports marketing organisations such as Synergy and Octagon and governing bodies like Premiership Rugby. For more information, visit http://www.sportbusiness.com/products/conferences or join their LinkedIn group.

Another company specialising in networking events is the Sports Industry Group. They organise one of the most high profile events in the sports industry calendar, the Sports Industry Awards. They also organise a range of smaller events throughout the year including the Sports Industry Breakfast Club and the Sports Industry Lecture which also feature high profile speakers. To find out more, visit http://www.sportindustry.biz or connect with them on LinkedIn.

So if you’re thinking about moving into the sports industry, now could be the time. Sport is very much on the agenda at the moment and the legacy of the Olympic Games should provide some interesting opportunities. It’s up to you to find them.

About our Ambassador: Keith McGuinness is a freelance copywriter based in South West London. Connect with him on Twitter @mcginty312

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