The Fetch Blog

Curated reads and events for professionals

How to connect with top players in your industry while working from home — July 7, 2015

How to connect with top players in your industry while working from home

Working from home comes with a plethora of benefits including low to no overhead, the convenience of creating your own schedule, and working in a space where you can best focus on a project. However, there are also some relatively large drawbacks when you work in isolation, including a lack of effective networking opportunities. Having a hard time creating relationships with thought leaders and influencers in your industry? Here are some fool-proof ways that you can connect with important people in your field while managing your workload remotely:

1) Find relevant online groups

One of the greatest benefits of the Internet is its capacity to bring like-minded people together. The hard part isn’t necessarily finding a group; it’s deciding which ones to follow! On Linkedin, search in the “Interests” category to determine which group best suits what you’re looking for. If you can’t find one that fits, you might consider starting your own. Another good resource for finding relevant groups and influencers is Twitter. Click on a category of interest and follow leading players. From there, comment on their tweets or start a chat of your own. You may also consider following some blogs written by successful people in your field. Many times, they’ll share great tips and advice to follow. Leave a comment at the end of their blog and it’s likely they’ll respond. The possibilities are endless when it comes to the online communities that are available.

2) Attend events

It’s nice to chat online and join in discussions, but let’s face it: nothing makes as big an impression as face-to-face meetings. Websites like The Fetch gather important events in major cities around the world so that you can meet with others in your industry. If you don’t live near one of these metropolises, don’t worry. You still can attend chamber mixers, conferences, or special interest clubs in your own demographic through meetups that highlight events within a certain radius of your specific city.

3) Connect with friends (and their friends)

Whether you realize it or not, every friend you have on Facebook and every person you chat with at a party is part of your networking strategy. Think of it like this: if you have 300 friends on Facebook and each of those friends has 300 friends, you are just two steps away from thousands of people who could potentially impact your career. So make your dreams and what you do for a living known! Who knows if your high school buddy has a friend at Lucas Films or a cousin at Amazon that would be willing to give you a few pointers as to how to enter their companies.

4) Leave an online trail

Another way to meet professionals in your field is to leave a strong paper trail on the Internet. Publish your works on Articlebase, Tumblr, Google+, or LinkedIn. Create a blog to shares your professional tips and insights, and share your posts on Twitter or Facebook. Get your name out there and let others in your field find you while they’re scanning through search engine results. (Another benefit to this: you will establish credibility in your field by the knowledge you share.)

It can be difficult to connect with others in your industry when working from home, but reaching your professional potential and creating success are both tied to the business relationships that you create. Keeping up to date in your field and finding future job opportunities will depend on the people that you know or reach out to. It may take a little extra time, but the benefits will far outweigh the sacrifice.

About our writer // Christina Morales is a freelance writer specializing in creating online marketing content. Her dream is to one day rule the world with just an iPad, a case of Cherry Coke, Twizzlers, and a glue gun.

8 places to find a startup job in Australia — September 29, 2013

8 places to find a startup job in Australia

jobs

Finding a new job or info on how to join an upcoming startup in Australia can be difficult as there’s no one place to discover opportunities. Luckily, we’ve listed a few places below to kick-off your search.

The Australian startup community has really grown in the past few years – in fact nearly all of the coworking spaces, accelerators and meetups you see today didn’t exist pre-2011. (We remember heading along to Silicon Beach Drinks when there were just five people there!) Funding has also come on a lot but most startups are still poorly resourced or slowly bootstrapping so employment opportunities (well, the paid kind) are limited.

Many US companies are now going international and localising city-by-city in Australia. Uber, Etsy, Yammer, Yelp, oDesk, Airbnb, General Assembly, Stripe and Twitter have all recently set-up shop here and are often looking for talent. However, if you are making the shift from corporate to startup, we recommended getting a solid taste of startup life and going in at the early-stage. This way, you can make a bigger impact, have more responsibility and grow with the company (or see it fail, which is arguably a better experience to have).

One of the downsides of taking a startup job in Australia is that company regulations and structure often means it’s harder to allocate stock to employees. Some startups here won’t even put equity on the table. Salaries can also vary from being globally competitive to barely offering a living wage. The other elephant in the room is the visa situation – Australia can be strict so you’ll need to research the best pathway for you.

With all this in mind, check out our handy guide on how to discover startup jobs in Oz:

1) The Silicon Beach Jobs Board

This is a community-led initiative and is the most specific site for startup jobs in Oz. It has lots of promise but unfortunately doesn’t get updated too much. Often Sydney-centric, there are full-time, part-time and casual opps on offer. Don’t forget to check out the Google Group for jobs posted directly there too.

2) City-specific mailing lists

Many community groups and meetup organisers maintain a mailing list for announcements to their communities. In these (somewhat sporadic) updates, they regularly include new roles. Lean Startup Melbourne, Silicon Beach Drinks and Fishburners are some examples.

3) Accelerators

Accelerators can be the breeding ground of startups that are looking for funding. Startmate, AngelCube and BlueChilli are a few suggestions in Australia to look out for – check out the companies in each batch and ping some of the founders with an intro and your background. When the time is right to scale their team, you’ll have already built a relationship with them. Check out a full list of more incubators and accelerators here.

4) VC firms

Similar to the above, contacting venture capital firms directly and asking if their portfolio companies have any jobs going can be effective. This is also key for senior hires and if you’re thinking about moving countries, since VCs are dealing with the most well-funded tech startups in Australia. Southern Cross, Starfish, Blackbird Ventures and the local angel networks are worth checking out.

5) AngelList

AngelList is the best site to search for startup jobs in the US. It’s also doing nicely in Australia. The key is using the filters to refine your search by location. Even if startups aren’t hiring, here’ll you’ll find a good signal of who’s strong in each city. For instance https://angel.co/melbourne will deliver you a ranked list in Melbourne.

6) LinkedIn

LinkedIn is still an odd mix in Australia in that you’ll have some solid roles advertised here but it’s not that comprehensive. SEEK is still the leading job board but it’s become very noisy and rather broken in referring amazing talent. Actively search for jobs on  LinkedIn but also follow companies to get their news and openings in your news feed.

7) Offline 

There’s nothing like word of mouth for getting your next job. Here’s a great article on the power of weak ties in your network. But where to start? Check out many of the local events and coworking spaces to get out there and start meeting people. If you’re not yet on the ground, do some research and then start reaching out to people via Twitter and email.

“Jobs that people heard about via personal contacts were best of all. But when people got these word-of-mouth jobs, they most often came via a weak tie.”

8) The Fetch

And, of course, if you want all of the above curated in one weekly email digest, sign up to The Fetch – you can also submit your roles to us via email (contact details.) 🙂

So, where else do you recommend?

Image credit: Kasia Kaczmarek

About our contributor // Kate Kendall is the founder and CEO of The Fetch. She regularly blogs about startup life and helps businesses understand the role of community. Follow her on Twitter via @katekendall

Quit watching and start doing: Sport Business in London — July 28, 2012

Quit watching and start doing: Sport Business in London

Pic by @Olympics on IG

Despite hosting the biggest sporting event of the year, Londoners seem to be divided in their opinion about the Olympic Games. On one hand, you have the supporters who are proud that their city is featuring on the biggest stage of all. On the other, you have the sceptics who bemoan the inconvenience and alleged waste of money.

As residents of the host city, we have been exposed to aspects of the games that the rest of the world won’t be aware of. One of these, commercial rights, has at times been a controversial topic as the London Organising Committee (LOCOG) has clamped down hard on any company that they deem to be infringing the rights of their major sponsors.

No doubt this will have piqued the interest of many marketing professionals who may be coming across the business side of the sports industry for the first time. They might well be seduced by it and who could blame them? It’s a glamorous mix of high profile stars and huge amounts of money.

The same may well apply to various other professionals too, such as events or media. But how do you go about getting a job in sports?

First and foremost, you need to be able to prove that you have transferable skills. In that respect, it’s no different from moving between any other industries. But this shouldn’t prove to be a much of a barrier for professionals from the industries mentioned earlier.

What’s equally important is networking. As the old cliché goes, it’s not just what you know but who you know.

The good news is that the sports industry is relatively small and there are several dedicated networking events throughout the year.

The Sport Business Group, organise many of the most high profile conferences throughout the year, such as sports Marketing 360 which takes place on 27 September. While the line-up for this year’s conference hasn’t been announced yet, previous speakers have included representatives from many of the UK’s top sports marketing organisations such as Synergy and Octagon and governing bodies like Premiership Rugby. For more information, visit http://www.sportbusiness.com/products/conferences or join their LinkedIn group.

Another company specialising in networking events is the Sports Industry Group. They organise one of the most high profile events in the sports industry calendar, the Sports Industry Awards. They also organise a range of smaller events throughout the year including the Sports Industry Breakfast Club and the Sports Industry Lecture which also feature high profile speakers. To find out more, visit http://www.sportindustry.biz or connect with them on LinkedIn.

So if you’re thinking about moving into the sports industry, now could be the time. Sport is very much on the agenda at the moment and the legacy of the Olympic Games should provide some interesting opportunities. It’s up to you to find them.

About our Ambassador: Keith McGuinness is a freelance copywriter based in South West London. Connect with him on Twitter @mcginty312

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