The Fetch Blog

Curated reads and events for professionals

Coffee talk: Christine Amorose, blogger and brand partnership manager at Vimeo — July 19, 2015

Coffee talk: Christine Amorose, blogger and brand partnership manager at Vimeo

Christine Amorose is one of those rare people who can somehow do it all. When she’s not managing brand partnerships at Vimeo, she teaches yoga and writes for major publications like Condé Nast Traveler in addition to posting regularly on her popular blog, C’est Christine. We were lucky to catch up with Christine in this week’s edition of Coffee Talk, where she shares what she loves about her job, the coolest partnerships she’s working on, and where she hangs out in NYC.

How did you end up where you are today, working on brand partnerships at Vimeo [and blogging at C’est Christine]?

I used to work in marketing and social media for a photography-related brand, and I loved the photo/video space. We also used Vimeo to host our lifestyle/product videos, and I was really impressed by the quality of the site and quirky brand voice. I thought that Vimeo would be a dream next step in the industry. When I started yoga teacher training in early 2014, the girl who sat next to me on the very first night of training introduced herself and said she worked at Vimeo. I immediately thought: I have to be friends with this girl! Well, I befriended her and learned more about the culture at Vimeo and the work she was doing on brand partnerships–and less than six months later, I was working with her. In addition to my full-time job at Vimeo, I also blog about travel and lifestyle at and contribute to publications like Afar and Condé Nast Traveler.

Which brands have been most memorable to work with? 

We just launched the Connected Series with Samsung, which is such a cool example of the work we do. Samsung and Vimeo teamed up to ask 10 amazing filmmakers to explore the idea of connection, and each piece is so unique and true to the filmmaker’s style and vision. My personal favorite was Elemental by : : kogonada: he basically showed how humans went from rocks to computers, and it’s all so beautifully edited with absolutely perfect sound design. It’s awesome when brands like Samsung are willing to fund projects that push boundaries and spark conversations.

What’s your favorite thing about the Vimeo product?

The videos! Vimeo is home to some of the best videos on the internet, and our Curation team is fantastic at finding the ones that are truly worth watching. I also love how supportive the Vimeo community is: the comments are always so positive, encouraging, inquisitive. There’s a low tolerance for trolling and a real celebration of creativity, which makes watching and sharing good work a very pleasant experience.

Who has had the most influence on your career so far?

To be honest: probably my mom! She has always encouraged me to go meet new people, to travel, to take some career risks. When I was debating quitting my first job out of college to move to France, she told me that there would always be jobs for good people — and that you can always make more money. Those two pieces of advice have been key in how I make career and life choices.

Outside of the office, you’re an adored travel writer and blogger. What made you want to start sharing your stories?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer: I was constantly writing stories as a kid, and I majored in journalism. And then I decided to start traveling, and suddenly life seemed a little more interesting and worth sharing. I’ve been blogging for five years now, and I just don’t know what I would do with all these thoughts and musings and photographs if I didn’t have an outlet for them.

Where do you find inspiration?

So many places! Travel is a go-to source of inspiration: new places, new people, new routines forces me to look at things differently. And I find that I can mimic that type of inspiration just by exploring a new neighborhood in New York City. I love that you can live in this city for years and constantly discover a new street, restaurant, park. I’m also so inspired by my friends who are pushing boundaries, starting businesses, creating a niche for themselves through photography, art, words, and technology. I have a few friends who I love getting coffee with because I always leave the cafe so buoyed with optimism and new ideas.

What do you want to learn next?

How to make videos! I’ve been playing with making iPhone videos using the Cameo app and I watch so many videos working at Vimeo that it’s made me more curious to explore telling stories through video.

Where can we find you in NYC?

Grabbing a coffee at Sweatshop or Happy Bones, biking around Prospect Park, catching up with friends over cocktails at Gallow Green or an ice cream at Oddfellows — or most likely, stuck on the L train.

What are your can’t-miss events in NYC?

Rooftop Films, Travel Massive, outdoor yoga at Bryant Park.

How can we connect with you?

Instagram! Twitter! Email! I’m on all the networks, and I love catching up over coffee when my schedule permits.

Last, how do you like your coffee?

Iced with almond milk in the summer, in latte form in the winter. No added sugar!

10 time-saving methods to help you master scheduling — May 6, 2015

10 time-saving methods to help you master scheduling


This is a post that first appeared on my blog last year.

I think of the last two years I’ve spent in New York as professional finishing school. If there’s anywhere on this planet where people are stupendously busy, it’s this place. It definitely took me a few months to settle into the rhythm. Combine this experience with recently fundraising, and I now feel incredible mindful of everyone’s time. So, without ado, I wanted to share 10 tips on how to win at professional time etiquette:

1) For the love of humankind, be direct with asks

Growing up in England and Australia, I was taught to be the opposite of direct. Skirt around issues, don’t address things head on, be tirelessly polite and pad lots of superfluous info around a lone ask. What I’ve now learnt is that one of the kindest things you can do for someone’s time, is to be as direct as possible. Don’t ask someone for coffee if you can put something in a one-sentence email.

2) Do double opt-in introductions

When I receive an email with the subject line: “Introduction…” my heart sinks. Connecting someone to another without asking the person if they want to opt-in, in a professional context, isn’t a favour to the recipient – it’s often a burden. In the days of overflowing inboxes, managing requests and day-to-day work – we can be plagued with guilt of not being on top of it all. The best referrers understand signal over noise – what each party is looking for. Over time when you build up trust in a professional relationship… use it wisely.

As Fred Wilson writes on AVC:

“When introducing two people who don’t know each other, ask each of them to opt-in to the introduction before making it.”

If you’re the one asking for an intro, include the context and a blurb that the introducer can easily copy across. Make it easy for people to help you.

3) Bcc the introducer post introduction

Once you have that intro, reply! It sounds super obvious but there’s been countless times when someone has sent an intro to me and the requester didn’t reply. Don’t be that person! When you do reply, move the person introducing you to bcc so they see you’re on it but you’re not clogging their inbox. Simply say thanks and that you’re moving the introducer to bcc in the email copy. No more getting stuck on irrelevant back and forths.

4) Don’t ask questions that you can easily google

Please don’t ask what someone’s email address is via social media when you can easily find it on the web. The same goes for other minutiae like addresses. If I’m sending a calendar invite through for a meeting, I’ll find the office address online (if it’s not on the website, look in their email signature, Foursquare/Yelp data and so forth).

If you’re reaching out to someone for advice, make sure you’ve read what’s out there first. Every man and his dog seems to have been interviewed about their journey or write a blog with their thoughts these days. Don’t make people repeat themselves.

5) Don’t abuse Facebook messages

This depends on personal preferences but I’m less of a fan of using Facebook messages for work comms. In a way, I’m glad Facebook is now splitting out the messenger app so I don’t have to install it and can switch off from another inbox to manage. If you want to say something important and have a request, don’t send it via Facebook. It’s likely just going to sit in someone’s ‘Other’ section unnoticed or just annoy them while they’re busy wading through the latest click bait in their feeds!

6) Calendar invites or it’s not happening

If you’ve arranged to meet someone or are hosting an event – calendar invite that thing up! Forget Facebook events invites or group text messages, New Yorkers sendPaperless Post invites that you add straight into your calendar. It often takes weeks to get on people’s schedule here – you’ve got to make sure you’re literally on it. If you’re finding scheduling is taking up a lot of time, check out services like Zirtualor

7) Do phone calls

I have to admit, I used to hate phone calls… I’d much prefer an email. When I first moved to New York, I was surprised at all the phone call suggestions verse in-person meetings. The thing is, getting around the city takes a lot of time so why spend two hours out of your day commuting then having coffee, when you could fit it in an half-hour phone call. The same goes for email – if you’re forming work relationships, don’t ping emails back and forth, New Yorkers pick up the phone and hustle.

8) Do your background research

Preparation and research beforehand will make your meetings. Don’t spend time asking basic questions – the more you can deep dive, the livelier, more interesting and memorable the conversation will be. If you’re fundraising, for instance, go in knowing what companies/founders someone’s invested in, what their investment thesis is and if you’re at the right stage (e.g. What’s their average check size?). It’s likely not worth both of your time, if these things don’t align.

In terms of insights, Refresh is seriously a great app – it offers a nice (and often a bit too ‘stalkerish’) overview of the people you’re meeting with. It’s actually made it onto my phone’s homescreen it’s been that useful.

9) If you’re not 10 minutes early, you’re late

Australians are known, well, for being casual with time. It’s quite okay to ‘rock up’ five to 10 minutes late to a meeting there. I mean, it’s obviously not great manners but most people do it. Fast forward to when I moved to New York, and had a steep learning curve. Over time, I’ve stopped arriving in the nick of time – and now give myself 10-15 minutes before any meeting.

10) Follow through

Pipeline’s Natalia Oberti Noguera recently said at a conference:

“Fortune is in the follow up.”

All of the above tips are nothing if you don’t follow up and follow through. Following up makes it worth it and is the ‘getting stuff done’ part – make sure you get your follow ups done within a few days post-meeting.

Hello Erin – our New York curator — March 31, 2014

Hello Erin – our New York curator


“I always thought I was crazy with the amount of side interests I like to pursue and projects I like to take on outside of work – until I moved here and realized I had found my tribe!”

After our beta launch in New York last June, it’s been so great to see the warm reception and organic uptake of The Fetch in the city. We now couldn’t be happier to share that Erin Greenawald will be our new curator in NY. Erin has been a subscriber since the beginning and by day, is an editor at career-loving startup The Muse. We took a few minutes to ask Erin about her background:

How did you end up where you are today? 

It all started when I dreamt of being an actress on broadway at age nine. While I haven’t stepped foot in the theater since I moved up to NYC almost a year ago, I managed to make it up here somehow. I wasn’t in love with what I was studying at school in DC so took a chance at a virtual internship in a different field with a startup while I finished my degree. Before I knew it I had a job offer from them (before I graduated – the dream!) and was asked to move to NYC ASAP. Since then I’ve been happily working as an editor helping give non-boring career advice by day at The Muse!

Why did you want to get involved with The Fetch?

Networking has never exactly been my thing – I’d generally prefer to be curled up on my couch with a good book or cooking with a friend. But when I moved here with almost no network to be seen, I knew I wanted to push myself to get out there and get to know the vibrant tech and startup community surrounding me. It’s been a wild ride so far, and I know I still have so many more fantastic people to meet – and I think The Fetch will really help take me to that next level.

What things excite you about our community right now? 

I’m so thrilled to get the chance to connect with so many different people – both in NYC and around the world – who are all passionate about getting the most out of their city that they can! I think everyone in The Fetch community is incredibly busy and interesting, but also very welcoming and excited to welcome others into the circle, which is something that really resonates with me.

What events do you recommend in NYC?

I like trying to find events that are a different format than your typical networking event (see above). So panels, hackathons, dinners – anything that’s not standing around mingling keeps me interested!

What’s your favourite thing about your city? 

I love that this city is always surprising me. I’m always reading about events or festivals or art exhibits or new concept bars or restaurants and thinking “that exists?!” But of course – it’s New York City. It really feeds into my love of trying new things, and they’re often things I didn’t even know I wanted to try.

What’s unique about NYC?

I always thought I was crazy with the amount of side interests I like to pursue and projects I like to take on outside of work – until I moved here and realized I had found my tribe! So may people have their main job (which is usually pretty cool in the first place) and then the company they’re trying to start on the side or the artistic interest that they manage to keep thriving in their free time. It’s such an inspirational and motivational group of people to be around.

Where can we find you in NYC? 

During the week Flatiron is my stomping grounds (the dog park in Madison Square Park is better than coffee breaks and I can’t wait for Madison Square Eats season). On the weekends, Brooklyn usually! Once the weather finally gets nicer you’ll likely see me at the Grand Army Plaza farmer’s market and Prospect Park almost every weekend.

How can we connect with you? 

Reach out on Twitter @erinacously or email

If you didn’t live in NYC, where would you be? 

I’ve always felt the pull of the west coast. Seattle or Portland may be in my future, though I’m a little worried about the rain!

Live in New York? Sign up to our weekly event-packed email digests now!

Breather launches in New York to help people discover quiet spaces by the hour — March 17, 2014

Breather launches in New York to help people discover quiet spaces by the hour


Breather is a new service that lets you find beautiful, practical spaces that you can reserve on the go. Some say its like Airbnb for non-sleeping spaces that help you find peace and quiet, on demand, in busy cities.

Continue reading

How Threadless, The Huffington Post and Fitocracy understand the business value of community — January 14, 2014

How Threadless, The Huffington Post and Fitocracy understand the business value of community


Do you understand the business value of community? Sarah Judd Welch of Loyal provides some solid examples from Threadless, The Huffington Post and Fitocracy…

Over the past few years, I’ve seen and felt first hand the skepticism of business leaders and traditional marketing folks around the financial return on investing in community initiatives. While it used to be that most of the evidence was anecdotal, today there are quite a few examples of community efforts moving the bottom line among the biggest and smallest of brands.

Let’s keep in mind the goals of community when talking about return: connect people to each other, make them happy, and make them stay (retention). All three of these goals strongly correlate with brand loyalty, referrals, and engagement metrics. With these in mind, consider the following statistics:

  • It costs 80% less to retain a customer than to acquire a new one
  • Increasing customer retention rate by 5% can increase profits by up to 95% over the long-term (HBS)
  • Increased engagement on community sites can result in up to 25% increase in revenue (MSI)
  • Friend recommendations are the number one influencing factor in purchase decisions (Brand Advocates)

Image source:

Although these stats are impressive, nothing demonstrates a point quite like real-life examples. Take Threadless – a creative community created by skinnyCorp that makes, supports, and buys great art – the perfect model of crowdsourcing and customer community success. At Threadless, e-commerce and community intersect; members submit designs (originally t-shirts, and now other stuff) that fellow members can purchase. Founded in 2000 with just $1000, the community has now grown to 2.5 million members globally with more than 500,000 designs submitted and nearly 5000 designs printed. Together, Threadless members have helped raise nearly $8.8 million for more than 1200 artists worldwide. How’s that for ROI on community?

Likewise, The Huffington Post, arguably the largest actively managed community on the internet, also benefits as a media company from strong community investment. HuffPo leverages its commenter community to distribute content and drive new and returning visits to the site with roughly 9.5 million pre-moderated comments per month. As a content trendsetter, the media powerhouse has sought to ensure a safe place for people to comment, according to its previous Director of Community, Justin Isaf. While the company does use an algorithm to help moderate spammy or inappropriate comments, the community is largely self-policed, reducing the need for headcount on HuffPo’s community moderation team. Partially as a result of its community, HuffPo sees 70M unique visitors and 1.1B pageviews in the US. alone. The results are clear: community engagement and distribution means more site views and unique visitors, a major selling point for advertisers and content sponsors.

Like Threadless, Fitocracy is a community platform. The fitness gamification network is built around a community of people motivating each other to get healthy everyday. The network has grown from 300,000 to more than 1.5 million users since it launched out of beta in March 2012 and has more user engagement than Twitter. According to founder Dick Talens, users come back to the app seven days a week even if they’re not working out – just because they’re so engrossed in the community. The app has also found a new way to monetize community with group fitness plans built around two of the most valuable benefits of any community – accountability and support among members. Aiming to replace the typical “gym trainer model,” the group fitness plans assign small groups of Fitocracy community members to one trainer for a fraction of what training would cost at a gym (plans are $50-77/month). The groups are held accountable to report their progress to the trainer and to each other through communication systems such as Google Hangouts and Q&As. Fitocracy has effectively monetized their community itself.

These examples show that community really can have a significant (and positive) impact on your bottom line, whether it’s through retention, increased engagement, referrals, or a revenue stream built around fulfilling the needs of an existing community. You’re most likely already interacting with your users, and many of them are likely already interacting with each other. Challenge yourself to reorganize the structure of these touch points to form a community that will contribute to your bottom line. Are you leveraging the value of community?

About our contributor // Sarah is the founder and Head of Community Design + BD at Loyal where she designs communities for startups, brands, and Fortune 100s. Find her at @sjw.

Image source: Nesta

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